About Kam

Kam Miller is a TV writer who has created pilots for Fox, CBS, 20th Century Fox, Paramount Television, and Universal Cable Productions. She wrote for Fox’s “Killer Instinct” as well as the long-running NBC show “Law & Order: SVU.” Her first feature, “The Iris Effect,” was produced while she was at USC film school. She wrote and directed “Descendents of Eden, ” a sci-fi short film that premiered at the San Diego Comic-Con International Film Festival.

As a grad student, she created the highly successful USC First Pitch, the official pitch festival for the USC School of Cinematic Arts. As an alumna, she co-created USC First Team, a program that shepherds teams of writers, directors, and producers through development and takes feature projects out to the industry.

At USC, Kam received the NBC Fellowship. She is also an alum of the CBS Writers Mentoring Program and Fox Writers Program. She recently graduated from the WGA Showrunners Training Program.

In 2014, Kam’s debut novel Myth of Crime was published. Dark and compelling, this crime suspense thriller probes human and supernatural depths. Myth of Crime introduces Victims Assistance Center psychologist Dr. Erika Harlow and rookie homicide detective Carter Hunt. Together, they investigate the emergence of a serial killer who defies the usual criminal profile models.

Kam also collaborated with other women TV writers on a short story anthology, Empower: Fight Like a Girl, which benefits the non-profit Lupus Foundation of America. Her short story, “Dangerous Stars,” features Myth of Crime characters Dr. Erika Harlow and Detective Carter Hunt. Empower: Fight Like a Girl
is available from Amazon.

Currently, Kam is developing several TV projects and writing her second novel.

Follow Kam on twitter @kammotion

20 replies

  1. Hi Kam. Thanks again for the helpful info! What would you suggest for a writer-director in terms of finding a director mentor? I have approached quite a number of directors who have not even bothered to reply. Writers have been much more approachable.

    And then how to get in the room to pitch my film as a series. As straightforward as approaching every prod co who has a TV/cable deal? Thanking you again for your time and consideration! Best, Thomas

    • Hi Thomas –

      First question – how do you get a director mentor? It sounds like you’re making a lot of the right moves. Generally, people strike up a relationship with industry pros they would like to have as mentors vs. flat-out asking the pros to be mentors. Industry pros like to get to know someone and if they click with the person, a mentorship happens naturally.

      Check out my mentor series: How to get ‘em, keep ‘em and be a great one. The series is under the industry advice header. Also, go to my resource page and check out the resource programs for directors. They’re another great way to get mentors.

      Second question – how do you get into a room to pitch a TV show? The prod cos, networks, and studios will only set up meetings through agents or managers. Your representation will help you get into the right rooms with the right people. Work with them to figure out your best strategy to pitch your TV show.

      There is a great book that covers a lot of these questions. It’s called “Hollywood Game Plan” by Carole Kirschner. Check out my interview with Carole. It’s under industry pro articles. It has a link to her site and book.

      Cheers!

  2. I am so excited to have found your blog Kam! It’s Suzy from HELP.Something reminded me of you, I looked you up and here you are. I am following even though I am not connected to the industry in any way, shape, or form. Just here to support.

    • Hey there! I’ve been thinking of you, too. Hope all is well. I just finished my exercise for the day. I’ll actually be posting something that might interest YOU tomorrow! xo

      • Thanks for the helpful information, Kam. How would you suggest a writer -director find a mentor for directing television? The directors I’ve reached out to don’t even bother to reply (perhaps the competitiveness?) while writers are so much more approachable.
        Thanking you again for your time and consideration! Thomas

        • Hi Thomas –

          First question – how do you get a director mentor? It sounds like you’re making a lot of the right moves. Generally, people strike up a relationship with industry pros they would like to have as mentors vs. flat-out asking the pros to be mentors. Industry pros like to get to know someone and if they click with the person, a mentorship happens naturally.

          Check out my mentor series: How to get ‘em, keep ‘em and be a great one. The series is under the industry advice header. Also, go to my resource page and check out the resource programs for directors. They’re another great way to get mentors.

          Second question – how do you get into a room to pitch a TV show? The prod cos, networks, and studios will only set up meetings through agents or managers. Your representation will help you get into the right rooms with the right people. Work with them to figure out your best strategy to pitch your TV show.

          There is a great book that covers a lot of these questions. It’s called “Hollywood Game Plan” by Carole Kirschner. Check out my interview with Carole. It’s under industry pro articles. It has a link to her site and book.

          Cheers!

  3. Hi Kam. I wrote Project Moses which I saw from your tweet that you downloaded recently. If you have a chance to read it, I’d welcome any feedback particularly from a fellow writer. Enjoyed the blog. You’re a busy lady!

    • I’m looking forward to reading your book, Robert. You certainly have an impressive background. And I love mystery thrillers. I think “Project Moses” will be a great read. Thanks for checking out my blog!

  4. Hey Kam, like your blog. As a Screenwriter I especially love all the events you post about. Anything related to the film industry. I Write, but I am also a Great Networker and love socializing.

    Thanks.

    • Thanks, Kevin. I’ll have to write more about events. I just went to the CineGear film festival here in LA and saw some awesome short films: Paul Grellong’s “Tracer Gun” and Moon Molson’s “Crazy Beats Strong Every Time” were stand-outs. Plus, the Great American Pitch festival drinks function last night was packed and lots of fun. I’ll try to post more about events. Thanks for reading!

  5. Kam! This is great. I’ll definitely be reading to keep me going and keep that positive energy up! Looking forward to your next entry.

  6. This is great Kam! I’ll be following along!!!

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